Organising photos visually

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
28 messages Options
12
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
(transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a way
to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.

Any ideas?

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
> information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a way
> to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
> Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
> understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
> exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.

To be clear: my target is to be able to open a set of files, then drag
and drop thumbnails into the right order, then generate new filenames
for them with an index number for further batch processing.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Tim
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Tim
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
Allegedly, on or about 29 January 2018, Patrick O'Callaghan sent:
> Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> course many of them are out of order.

I suppose it depends on how you're going to view them.  If you're just
going to use any photo viewer, you might have to start custom-naming
the images.

If you're going to use a presentation viewer, as a slideshow, you could
arrange the order in that.

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -rsvp
Linux 4.14.13-200.fc26.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Jan 11 05:43:34 UTC 2018 x86_64

Boilerplate:  All mail to my mailbox is automatically deleted.
There is no point trying to privately email me, I only get to see
the messages posted to the mailing list.

Programmers who can't take criticisms shouldn't release software that's
so crap it seriously pisses people off.
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

William Oliver
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:

> Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
> information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a
> way
> to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
> Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
> understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
> exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> poc


I think the buzzword for searching for software is "gallery," and
most of them are web-based.  I use pwigo (www.pwigo.org ), which has a
manual sort option (though you have to dig in a little to find it).

But if you're not serving a web page somewhere, I don't know.  There's
always the Wikipedia page to sort through, I guess, though I don't find
that useful as often as I hope:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparis
on_of_photo_gallery_software


billo
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 07:49 -0500, William Oliver wrote:

> On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> > Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> > (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> > course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
> > information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a
> > way
> > to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
> > Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
> > understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
> > exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
> >
> > Any ideas?
> >
> > poc
>
>
> I think the buzzword for searching for software is "gallery," and
> most of them are web-based.  I use pwigo (www.pwigo.orgorg ), which has a
> manual sort option (though you have to dig in a little to find it).

It's actually piwigo, but thanks. I'll take a look.

> But if you're not serving a web page somewhere, I don't know.  There's
> always the Wikipedia page to sort through, I guess, though I don't find
> that useful as often as I hope:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparis
> on_of_photo_gallery_software

I'm already using Google Photos, which I suppose counts as a gallery,
but it can get a bit slow when dealing with large batches so I
generally use it for sharing the final results. My idea was to find a
tool to process photos locally before uploading them. I'll check out
that Wikipedia page in any case.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Stephen Morris
On 30/1/18 12:22 am, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:

> On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 07:49 -0500, William Oliver wrote:
>> On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
>>> Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
>>> (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
>>> course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
>>> information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a
>>> way
>>> to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
>>> Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
>>> understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
>>> exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
>>>
>>> Any ideas?
>>>
>>> poc
>>
>> I think the buzzword for searching for software is "gallery," and
>> most of them are web-based.  I use pwigo (www.pwigo.orgorg ), which has a
>> manual sort option (though you have to dig in a little to find it).
> It's actually piwigo, but thanks. I'll take a look.
>
>> But if you're not serving a web page somewhere, I don't know.  There's
>> always the Wikipedia page to sort through, I guess, though I don't find
>> that useful as often as I hope:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparis
>> on_of_photo_gallery_software
> I'm already using Google Photos, which I suppose counts as a gallery,
> but it can get a bit slow when dealing with large batches so I
> generally use it for sharing the final results. My idea was to find a
> tool to process photos locally before uploading them. I'll check out
> that Wikipedia page in any case.

I do most of my photo editing with Photoshop Elements/Organiser in
Windows, which potentially has the capability you are looking for
particularly via organiser, but I'm not sure of the graphic quality if
running it from a VM (when I tried in the past I wasn't able to get it
to install and work under wine). I haven't played around much with
similar photo editing tools under Linux, but I'm wondering if
'Rawtherapee' or 'DarkTable' have the functionality you are looking for?
If I remember correctly, both packages are in the Fedora repositories.


regards,

Steve

>
> poc
> _______________________________________________
> users mailing list -- [hidden email]
> To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Cameron Simpson-2
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
On 29Jan2018 12:35, Patrick O'Callaghan <[hidden email]> wrote:

>On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
>> Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
>> (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
>> course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
>> information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a way
>> to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
>> Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
>> understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
>> exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
>
>To be clear: my target is to be able to open a set of files, then drag
>and drop thumbnails into the right order, then generate new filenames
>for them with an index number for further batch processing.

How about a low tech approach? Open your favourite GUI directory browser
capable of showing thumbnails. Open it on your directories of unsorted images.  
Make another directory "staging" and "ordered" somewhere.

Run a small shell script like this (untested, but happy to help debug):

  cd your-staging-directory
  n=1
  while :
  do
    for f in *.jpg
    do
      [ -s "$f" ] || continue
      while :
      do
        target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
        [ -e "$target" ] || break
        n=$((n+1))
      done
      mv "$f" "$target"
    done
    sleep 1
  done

That does a "mv", so give it a good test on copies first to avoid it eating
your files!

Then just drag images into the staging directory in the right order and the
shell script will move them into the ordered directory with nice numeric
prefixes.

You might want to presage this with a manual presort of groups of images into
obvious collections (family, events, what have you), then to drag those into
the staging directory in the desired order.

Cheers,
Cameron Simpson <[hidden email]> (formerly [hidden email])
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
In reply to this post by Stephen Morris
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 08:20 +1100, Stephen Morris wrote:

> On 30/1/18 12:22 am, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> > On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 07:49 -0500, William Oliver wrote:
> > > On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> > > > Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> > > > (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> > > > course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
> > > > information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a
> > > > way
> > > > to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
> > > > Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
> > > > understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
> > > > exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
> > > >
> > > > Any ideas?
> > > >
> > > > poc
> > >
> > > I think the buzzword for searching for software is "gallery," and
> > > most of them are web-based.  I use pwigo (www.pwigo.orgorg ), which has a
> > > manual sort option (though you have to dig in a little to find it).
> >
> > It's actually piwigo, but thanks. I'll take a look.
> >
> > > But if you're not serving a web page somewhere, I don't know.  There's
> > > always the Wikipedia page to sort through, I guess, though I don't find
> > > that useful as often as I hope:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparis
> > > on_of_photo_gallery_software
> >
> > I'm already using Google Photos, which I suppose counts as a gallery,
> > but it can get a bit slow when dealing with large batches so I
> > generally use it for sharing the final results. My idea was to find a
> > tool to process photos locally before uploading them. I'll check out
> > that Wikipedia page in any case.
>
> I do most of my photo editing with Photoshop Elements/Organiser in
> Windows, which potentially has the capability you are looking for
> particularly via organiser, but I'm not sure of the graphic quality if
> running it from a VM (when I tried in the past I wasn't able to get it
> to install and work under wine). I haven't played around much with
> similar photo editing tools under Linux, but I'm wondering if
> 'Rawtherapee' or 'DarkTable' have the functionality you are looking for?
> If I remember correctly, both packages are in the Fedora repositories.

Neither of these is really what I'm looking for. They have lots of
tools for image manipulation, which might be useful at a later stage,
but don't address the question of just manually ordering the files.
Possibly they could be arm-twisted into doing this by means of copying,
 as could Digikam, Shotwell etc., but it's a lot of overkill for what
is in principal a very simple requirement: the files were scanned in a
certain order, but I want to reorder them in the sequence the shots
were actually taken. This has to be manual because the files have no
EXIF information. I appreciate that this is a rather specific
requirement so I'm not that surprised that it isn't supported.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
In reply to this post by Cameron Simpson-2
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 20:53 +1100, Cameron Simpson wrote:

> On 29Jan2018 12:35, Patrick O'Callaghan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > On Mon, 2018-01-29 at 12:27 +0000, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> > > Looking for some advice here. I have a large set of old slides
> > > (transparencies) which I'm currently scanning for the family, but of
> > > course many of them are out of order. Clearly they don't have EXIF
> > > information (they were taken in the 70s and 80s). I'm looking for a way
> > > to order them *visually* after scanning, but the usual apps (Digikam,
> > > Shotwell, Lightroom) don't seem to be able to do this. They only
> > > understand machine-readable sorting, e.g. by the file mod date, size,
> > > exposure data etc., none of which is useful in this case.
> >
> > To be clear: my target is to be able to open a set of files, then drag
> > and drop thumbnails into the right order, then generate new filenames
> > for them with an index number for further batch processing.
>
> How about a low tech approach? Open your favourite GUI directory browser
> capable of showing thumbnails. Open it on your directories of unsorted images.  
> Make another directory "staging" and "ordered" somewhere.
>
> Run a small shell script like this (untested, but happy to help debug):
>
>   cd your-staging-directory
>   n=1
>   while :
>   do
>     for f in *.jpg
>     do
>       [ -s "$f" ] || continue
>       while :
>       do
>         target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
>         [ -e "$target" ] || break
>         n=$((n+1))
>       done
>       mv "$f" "$target"
>     done
>     sleep 1
>   done
>
> That does a "mv", so give it a good test on copies first to avoid it eating
> your files!
>
> Then just drag images into the staging directory in the right order and the
> shell script will move them into the ordered directory with nice numeric
> prefixes.
>
> You might want to presage this with a manual presort of groups of images into
> obvious collections (family, events, what have you), then to drag those into
> the staging directory in the desired order.

This is much more on the lines of what I'm thinking of (and I'd even
started to imagine how to do it :-) so thanks for the effort. I'll
certainly look into it.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
In reply to this post by Cameron Simpson-2
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 20:53 +1100, Cameron Simpson wrote:

>   cd your-staging-directory
>   n=1
>   while :
>   do
>     for f in *.jpg
>     do
>       [ -s "$f" ] || continue
>       while :
>       do
>         target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
>         [ -e "$target" ] || break
>         n=$((n+1))
>       done
>       mv "$f" "$target"
>     done
>     sleep 1
>   done
>
> That does a "mv", so give it a good test on copies first to avoid it eating
> your files!

On second thoughts, I don't think this is going to work:

> Then just drag images into the staging directory in the right order and the
> shell script will move them into the ordered directory with nice numeric
> prefixes.

Dragging the files 'in the right order' doesn't affect their names. The
script loops over the files in lexical order, not in the order I've
dragged them, so the final order won't change. To be clearer, this is
an example directory listing:

$ ls -l
total 7388
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1036281 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_01.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1183695 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_02.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1133299 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_03.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1066885 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_04.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc  879477 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_05.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1247414 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_06.jpg
-rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1008515 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_07.jpg

The filenames are generated from the scanning software (a commercial
program running on a Windows VM, and beyond any possibility of
modifying). Clearly these names are just timestamps plus a sequence
number and represent the order the slides were scanned. Adding another
index number via the Shell script isn't going to change this sequence.

Currently the only recourse (apart from renaming each file manually) is
to upload the slides to the gallery (Google Drive) one by one in the
order I want. The gallery will then preserve that order. The problem is
that there are thousands of them (not completely random but organised
in boxes, which may have been shuffled over the years). What I'd prefer
to do is to at least order each box locally and then do a per-box
upload to the gallery.

Sorry if I wasn't clear enough in my initial post.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Tim
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Tim
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
Allegedly, on or about 30 January 2018, Patrick O'Callaghan sent:
> is in principal a very simple requirement: the files were scanned in
> a certain order, but I want to reorder them in the sequence the shots
> were actually taken. This has to be manual because the files have no
> EXIF information.

Find an EXIF editor, insert some basic meta data by hand?

At some stage you are probably want to going to edit metadata, to add
personal information (names, places, etc.) to images, rather than just
a series of numbered images.

I went through this pain, years ago, while taking photos at our state
fair over ten years (and the last one had 650 photos).  Having to name
the people in photos, what the photo was about, etc.  And while many
will say that the best place for meta data is in an external file, I
disagree.  The only way metadata will stay with a picture, as it gets
moved and copied about, is when it's incorporated into it.

I was using Gthumb, and I dabbled with shotwell, at some stage, to do
that kind of thing.  But I seem to recall it stored meta data in its
own system, separate from the images.

I can't recall which program, but you could select a batch of images,
give them all the same metadata (such as a common location).  Then
select individual images, customising them.  I can't remember if I
could select some of the prior batch and give them some extra common
metadata without losing prior metadata, though.

In essence, you're creating a database, and that's probably the best
way to approach it.  Surely there's some photography database software?

--
[tim@localhost ~]$ uname -rsvp
Linux 4.14.13-200.fc26.x86_64 #1 SMP Thu Jan 11 05:43:34 UTC 2018 x86_64

Boilerplate:  All mail to my mailbox is automatically deleted.
There is no point trying to privately email me, I only get to see
the messages posted to the mailing list.

Using Windows software is like coating all your handtools with sewage.
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Richard Shaw
From what I could tell searching google, you best bet is to plug in the info you need into the EXIF data and then rename the files based on the EXIF data.

I've never used this before but it only took me about 10 minutes to package:


If someone finds it useful (for this or in general) I may be willing to submit a review request to include it in Fedora.

Thanks,
Richard

_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Kenny Gow
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
On 01/30/2018 06:01 AM, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:

> $ ls -l
> total 7388
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1036281 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_01.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1183695 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_02.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1133299 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_03.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1066885 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_04.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc  879477 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_05.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1247414 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_06.jpg
> -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1008515 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_07.jpg
>
> The filenames are generated from the scanning software (a commercial
> program running on a Windows VM, and beyond any possibility of
> modifying). Clearly these names are just timestamps plus a sequence
> number and represent the order the slides were scanned. Adding another
> index number via the Shell script isn't going to change this sequence.
>
In the staging directory, try running

$ ls -lrt --time=ctime

to order the list by the time each image was put into the directory.
'ctime' is the key. I use this all the time to see the latest
new files in a directory, in time order.

You can also run

$ ls -lrt --time=ctime --full-time

to see the (more exact) time each file was moved into the directory.

K
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 08:56 -0600, Kenny Gow wrote:

> On 01/30/2018 06:01 AM, Patrick O'Callaghan wrote:
> > $ ls -l
> > total 7388
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1036281 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_01.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1183695 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_02.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1133299 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_03.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1066885 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_04.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc  879477 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_05.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1247414 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_06.jpg
> > -rwxr--r--. 1 poc poc 1008515 Jan 29 11:38 20180129113839_07.jpg
> >
> > The filenames are generated from the scanning software (a commercial
> > program running on a Windows VM, and beyond any possibility of
> > modifying). Clearly these names are just timestamps plus a sequence
> > number and represent the order the slides were scanned. Adding another
> > index number via the Shell script isn't going to change this sequence.
> >
>
> In the staging directory, try running
>
> $ ls -lrt --time=ctime
>
> to order the list by the time each image was put into the directory.
> 'ctime' is the key. I use this all the time to see the latest
> new files in a directory, in time order.
>
> You can also run
>
> $ ls -lrt --time=ctime --full-time
>
> to see the (more exact) time each file was moved into the directory.

Interesting idea. I'll think about that, thanks.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
In reply to this post by Richard Shaw
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 08:44 -0600, Richard Shaw wrote:
> From what I could tell searching google, you best bet is to plug in the info you need into the EXIF data and then rename the files based on the EXIF data.
>
> I've never used this before but it only took me about 10 minutes to package:
>
> https://hobbes1069.fedorapeople.org/Photini-2017.12.0-1.fc27.noarch.rpm
>
> If someone finds it useful (for this or in general) I may be willing to submit a review request to include it in Fedora.

I took a quick look, but it doesn't seem to do anything the other photo
editors don't do, and still requires a one-by-one process of editing
each file.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Philip Rhoades
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
Richard,


On 2018-01-31 03:23, [hidden email] wrote:

> Date: Tue, 30 Jan 2018 08:44:50 -0600
> From: Richard Shaw <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Organising photos visually
> To: Community support for Fedora users <[hidden email]>
> Message-ID:
> <CAN3TeO3_gXh=GOJVE4=Zq_Bt=T+pGZv=[hidden email]>
> Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
> boundary="001a113c3c4cb25e410563ff6767"
>
> --001a113c3c4cb25e410563ff6767
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"
>
>> From what I could tell searching google, you best bet is to plug in
>> the
> info you need into the EXIF data and then rename the files based on the
> EXIF data.
>
> I've never used this before but it only took me about 10 minutes to
> package:
>
> https://hobbes1069.fedorapeople.org/Photini-2017.12.0-1.fc27.noarch.rpm
>
> If someone finds it useful (for this or in general) I may be willing to
> submit a review request to include it in Fedora.


On Fedora 27 x86_64:

Traceback (most recent call last):
   File "/bin/photini", line 6, in <module>
     from pkg_resources import load_entry_point
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 3037, in <module>
     @_call_aside
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 3021, in _call_aside
     f(*args, **kwargs)
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 3050, in _initialize_master_working_set
     working_set = WorkingSet._build_master()
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 655, in _build_master
     ws.require(__requires__)
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 969, in require
     needed = self.resolve(parse_requirements(requirements))
   File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py",
line 855, in resolve
     raise DistributionNotFound(req, requirers)
pkg_resources.DistributionNotFound: The 'appdirs>=1.3' distribution was
not found and is required by Photini


P.
--
Philip Rhoades

PO Box 896
Cowra  NSW  2794
Australia
E-mail:  [hidden email]
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Richard Shaw
On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 10:45 AM, Philip Rhoades <[hidden email]> wrote:
Richard,

On Fedora 27 x86_64:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/bin/photini", line 6, in <module>
    from pkg_resources import load_entry_point
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 3037, in <module>
    @_call_aside
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 3021, in _call_aside
    f(*args, **kwargs)
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 3050, in _initialize_master_working_set
    working_set = WorkingSet._build_master()
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 655, in _build_master
    ws.require(__requires__)
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 969, in require
    needed = self.resolve(parse_requirements(requirements))
  File "/usr/lib/python3.6/site-packages/pkg_resources/__init__.py", line 855, in resolve
    raise DistributionNotFound(req, requirers)
pkg_resources.DistributionNotFound: The 'appdirs>=1.3' distribution was not found and is required by Photini

Just saw that a little while ago, I missed some requires. I've uploaded a new RPM (same URL)

Thanks,
Richard 

_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Patrick O'Callaghan
In reply to this post by Kenny Gow
On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 08:56 -0600, Kenny Gow wrote:
> $ ls -lrt --time=ctime
>
> to order the list by the time each image was put into the directory.
> 'ctime' is the key. I use this all the time to see the latest
> new files in a directory, in time order.

BTW, for that I tend to use:

$ ls -last ...

simply because it's easy to remember :-) I know it isn't exactly the
same but it's good enough in most cases.

poc
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Cameron Simpson-2
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
[ Brought back on list, since Jon is very correct. - Cameron ]

On 30Jan2018 05:09, Jon LaBadie <[hidden email]> wrote:

>On Tue, Jan 30, 2018 at 08:53:32PM +1100, Cameron Simpson wrote:
>> Run a small shell script like this (untested, but happy to help debug):
>>
>>  cd your-staging-directory
>>  n=1
>>  while :
>>  do
>>    for f in *.jpg
>>    do
>>      [ -s "$f" ] || continue
>>      while :
>>      do
>>        target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
>>        [ -e "$target" ] || break
>>        n=$((n+1))
>>      done
>>      mv "$f" "$target"
>>    done
>>    sleep 1
>>  done
>
>I think all the files will be named 00001-<orig_name>
>When there is no name collision you skip the increment.

Yes. Need to increment after the "mv" as well. Good call.

Thanks,
Cameron Simpson <[hidden email]> (formerly [hidden email])
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Organising photos visually

Cameron Simpson-2
In reply to this post by Patrick O'Callaghan
On 30Jan2018 12:01, Patrick O'Callaghan <[hidden email]> wrote:

>On Tue, 2018-01-30 at 20:53 +1100, Cameron Simpson wrote:
>>   cd your-staging-directory
>>   n=1
>>   while :
>>   do
>>     for f in *.jpg
>>     do
>>       [ -s "$f" ] || continue
>>       while :
>>       do
>>         target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
>>         [ -e "$target" ] || break
>>         n=$((n+1))
>>       done
>>       mv "$f" "$target"
>>     done
>>     sleep 1
>>   done
>>
>> That does a "mv", so give it a good test on copies first to avoid it eating
>> your files!
>
>On second thoughts, I don't think this is going to work:
>
>> Then just drag images into the staging directory in the right order and the
>> shell script will move them into the ordered directory with nice numeric
>> prefixes.
>
>Dragging the files 'in the right order' doesn't affect their names. The
>script loops over the files in lexical order, not in the order I've
>dragged them, so the final order won't change.

The idea is that the script picks up the files as fast as you drag them. You
might need to shrink the "sleep 1" to "sleep 0.1", or perhaps better, to not
sleep at all _if_ any files were run on that loop. The sleep is there to stop
your machine spinnning out when idle.

Provided the files are picked up suffiently promptly, they are meant to each
get a nice incrementing numeric prefix as you drag them, thus ordering their
names in the ordered directory.

>Sorry if I wasn't clear enough in my initial post.

I think I understood you. You seem to have missing the numeric profix in the
new names - the script _depends_ on you interactively dragging files to the
staging dir in a piecemeal fashion.

Also note Jons bug report.

Another untested version with a fix for his bug and a fix for the sleep thing:

   cd your-staging-directory
   n=1
   while :
   do
     moved=
     for f in *.jpg
     do
       [ -s "$f" ] || continue
       while :
       do
         target=$( printf 'your-ordered-directory/%05d-%s' "$n" "$f" )
         [ -e "$target" ] || break
         n=$((n+1))
       done
       mv "$f" "$target"
       n=$((n+1))
       moved=1
     done
     [ $moved ] || sleep 0.1
   done

See how that logic feels to you.

Cheers,
Cameron Simpson <[hidden email]> (formerly [hidden email])
_______________________________________________
users mailing list -- [hidden email]
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email]
12