Query about parasitic firefox file

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Query about parasitic firefox file

Bret Busby-2
Hello.

In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
disappeared, rendering the system unusable.

After having progressively shut the system down, before it crashed,
and, rebooting the system, with the free space still having been
disappeared, in searching for unexplained things, I found in the path
/home/me/.mozilla/firefox/<mixedstring>.default-<numericstring>/
the file places.sqlite-wal with Type "unknown" and size 1.5GB and Date
Modified being a couple of hours ago.

Does anyone know what is this file, what does it contain, and, can I
safely delete it without it causing further harm?

Thank you in anticipation.

--
Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia
..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Colin Law-2
On 7 March 2018 at 09:08, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hello.
>
> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>
> After having progressively shut the system down, before it crashed,
> and, rebooting the system, with the free space still having been
> disappeared, in searching for unexplained things, I found in the path
> /home/me/.mozilla/firefox/<mixedstring>.default-<numericstring>/
> the file places.sqlite-wal with Type "unknown" and size 1.5GB and Date
> Modified being a couple of hours ago.
>
> Does anyone know what is this file, what does it contain, and, can I
> safely delete it without it causing further harm?

This is an explanation of what it is all about
https://www.reddit.com/r/firefox/comments/7fbh5m/placessqlitewal_was_89gb_and_prevented_firefox/
so yes you can delete it. If you regularly get the problem suspect a
browser addon.

I imagine google would have found that for you, or something similar,
had you googled for sqlite-wal firefox

Colin

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Karl Auer
In reply to this post by Bret Busby-2
On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.

If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.

Regards, K

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Colin Law-2
On 7 March 2018 at 10:25, Karl Auer <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
>> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
>> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>
> If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
> more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.

The OP might be running on a PI with an SD card, or some similar device.

Colin

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

J. L.
In reply to this post by Karl Auer
On 07.03.2018 11:25, Karl Auer wrote:
> On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
>> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
>> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>
> If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
> more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.
>
> Regards, K
>

Though on the one hand You _probably_ are not really wrong (though not
necessarily really right as there may be specific reasons for this
scarcity of storage neither You nor me are or even can be aware of!) I
on the other hand too would be very suspicious and annoyed if my browser
started to store more than only some MEGA-bytes but really GIGA-bytes of
really unwanted or at least unsolicited data other than cache on my disk.

Regards, J

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Bret Busby-2
In reply to this post by Karl Auer
On 07/03/2018, Karl Auer <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
>> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
>> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>
> If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
> more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.
>
> Regards, K
>

It is an old (Dell Inspiron 580) i3 system, limited to 16GB RAM and (I
believe) limited to a  (about) 500GB HDD, of which, about 250GB is
locked by MS Win (7or XP - not sure which).

When Ubuntu 18.04.1 is released, I will review my systems and their builds.

I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.

--

Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia

..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Liam Proven
On 7 March 2018 at 13:00, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
> partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
> restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.

That's not enough for a safe, usable system these days.

Boot off a live medium, run GParted, remove the old Debian partition,
and extend your /home partition (or / if you don't have a separate
/home) into the free space.

For more detailed guidance, post the output of

sudo sfdisk -l

here.


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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

David Woyciesjes
In reply to this post by Colin Law-2
On 3/7/2018 5:35 AM, Colin Law wrote:

> On 7 March 2018 at 10:25, Karl Auer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
>>> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
>>> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>> If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
>> more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.
> The OP might be running on a PI with an SD card, or some similar device.
>
> Colin
>
Also, that was a perfect example of someone answering a question that
was not asked.

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Joel Rees
On Thu, Mar 8, 2018 at 1:25 AM, David Woyciesjes <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 3/7/2018 5:35 AM, Colin Law wrote:
>> On 7 March 2018 at 10:25, Karl Auer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On Wed, 2018-03-07 at 17:08 +0800, Bret Busby wrote:
>>>> In the last 12 hours, 1.4GB of my home directory free space
>>>> disappeared, rendering the system unusable.
>>> If the loss of 1.4Gb renders your system unusable, you definitely need
>>> more disk space. Time for a new hard disk or some housecleaning.
>> The OP might be running on a PI with an SD card, or some similar device.
>>
>> Colin
>>
> Also, that was a perfect example of someone answering a question that
> was not asked.

But both of those questions were begged, although the assertion about
current OSses being so disk hungry causes me pause.

--
Joel Rees

One of these days I'll get someone to pay me
to design a language that combines the best of Forth and C.
Then I'll be able to leap wide instruction sets with a single #ifdef,
run faster than a speeding infinite loop with a #define,
and stop all integer size bugs with my bare cast.
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More of my delusions:
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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Joel Rees
In reply to this post by Liam Proven
On Wed, Mar 7, 2018 at 10:42 PM, Liam Proven <[hidden email]> wrote:
> On 7 March 2018 at 13:00, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
>> partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
>> restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.
>
> That's not enough for a safe, usable system these days.

If that is true, the world has truly gone mad.

> Boot off a live medium, run GParted, remove the old Debian partition,
> and extend your /home partition (or / if you don't have a separate
> /home) into the free space.
>
> For more detailed guidance, post the output of
>
> sudo sfdisk -l
>
> here.

Bret, do not just blindly delete that partition.

First, post the results of sfdisk that Liam asks for, or use gparted
to show you the equivalent so you can ask about it on-list.

There may be a reason for being unable to access the partition or
there may not. And you want to think about how to expand /home, too.

--
Joel Rees

One of these days I'll get someone to pay me
to design a language that combines the best of Forth and C.
Then I'll be able to leap wide instruction sets with a single #ifdef,
run faster than a speeding infinite loop with a #define,
and stop all integer size bugs with my bare cast.
http://defining-computers.blogspot.com/2017/06/reinventing-computers.html

More of my delusions:
http://reiisi.blogspot.com/2017/05/do-not-pay-modern-danegeld-ransomware.html
http://reiisi.blogspot.jp/p/novels-i-am-writing.html

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Bret Busby-2
On 08/03/2018, Joel Rees <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, Mar 7, 2018 at 10:42 PM, Liam Proven <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 7 March 2018 at 13:00, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
>>> partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
>>> restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.
>>
>> That's not enough for a safe, usable system these days.
>
> If that is true, the world has truly gone mad.
>
>> Boot off a live medium, run GParted, remove the old Debian partition,
>> and extend your /home partition (or / if you don't have a separate
>> /home) into the free space.
>>
>> For more detailed guidance, post the output of
>>
>> sudo sfdisk -l
>>
>> here.
>
> Bret, do not just blindly delete that partition.
>

I do not know whether it is because I ran gparted from the installed
OS rather than from a live medium, but I am prevented from doing
anything with the partition. In the menu's, operations such as Delete
(Partition) are greyed out.

I do not know, but I assume that thatis because the partition was
created with Debian 6, and so the owner of the partition, belongs to
Debian 6, and not to the UbuntuMATE OS, as, whilst the partition can
me mounted in the UbuntuMATE session, because ownership belongs to the
(now deleted) Debian 6 installation, no operationscan be performed on
the Debian 6 OS partition. I can access the Debian 6 home partition,
without any problems; reading and writing to it.

I was wrong about the MS Win usage of that HDD - that computer has MS
Win 7 (the last incarnation of MS Win, that was usable), which
occupies a partition of about 80GB - it is on this computer, that has
the horrible MS Win8, that has the (about) 250GB locked up by MS Win.

The unusable partition on that computer, is about 10GB - I shrunked
the Debian 6 OS partition, to use the unused space, for data - so it
is probaly not woth doing anything with, before restructuring the
partitions on that HDD, after Ubuntu 18.04.1 is released.

I have an external HDD connected to that computer, and, big (128GB)
USB "thumb drives are available for sometimes relatively lowish
prices(as low as 50-50AUD), si I probably need to shift data off that
HDD, to free up more space in the home partition.

The / partition is about 24GB - 11GB free, and the home partition is
about 55GB, with (now ) about 1.2GB free.

--
Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia
..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Bret Busby
In reply to this post by Liam Proven
On Wed, 7 Mar 2018, Liam Proven wrote:

> Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2018 21:42:54
> From: Liam Proven <[hidden email]>
> Reply-To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions"
>     <[hidden email]>
> To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions"
>     <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Query about parasitic firefox file
>
> On 7 March 2018 at 13:00, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
>> partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
>> restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.
>
> That's not enough for a safe, usable system these days.
>
> Boot off a live medium, run GParted, remove the old Debian partition,
> and extend your /home partition (or / if you don't have a separate
> /home) into the free space.
>
> For more detailed guidance, post the output of
>
> sudo sfdisk -l
>
> here.
>

Whilst it was not requested, here is this;

"
:~$ df -h
Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
udev            7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /dev
tmpfs           1.6G  9.5M  1.6G   1% /run
/dev/sda5        24G   11G   12G  48% /
tmpfs           7.8G   97M  7.7G   2% /dev/shm
tmpfs           5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
tmpfs           7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/sda13       55G   51G  1.2G  98% /home
cgmfs           100K     0  100K   0% /run/cgmanager/fs
tmpfs           1.6G   56K  1.6G   1% /run/user/1000
/dev/sr1        884K  884K     0 100% /media/bret/HP Launcher
/dev/sdb1       466G   14G  452G   3% /media/bret/hp hard drive1
/dev/sda9        77G   73G  884K 100% /media/bret/Data01
/dev/sda10       77G   73G  4.5M 100% /media/bret/Data02
/dev/sda12       37G   35G  7.2M 100% /media/bret/Data03
/dev/sda14       68G   64G  6.1M 100% /media/bret/Data04
/dev/sda6       9.5G   23M  9.0G   1% /media/bret/Data05-10GB
/dev/sda8        77G   73G  348K 100%
/media/bret/a3074725-349d-4647-8b07-3a5526f7ee55
/dev/sda11       40G   40G  8.6M 100% /media/bret/41B78C85772DD3E4
"

Note, that is after the particular file was deleted, which freed up
about 1.7GB of the home partition, and, after subsequent downloads.

The partition with the label Data05-10GB is the ex-Debian6 OS partition,
to which I wanted to shift some data, to free up more space in the home
partition.

The output of the sfdisk (I first ran it as fdisk) comand, follows;

"
:~$ sudo sfdisk -l
[sudo] password for bret:
Disk /dev/sda: 596.2 GiB, 640135028736 bytes, 1250263728 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0xc0000000

Device     Boot      Start        End    Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sda1               63     144584     144522  70.6M de Dell Utility
/dev/sda2           145408   18204671   18059264   8.6G  7
HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3         18204672  182369879  164165208  78.3G  7
HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4        182369941 1250258624 1067888684 509.2G  5 Extended
/dev/sda5        182369943  231951974   49582032  23.7G 83 Linux
/dev/sda6        349140708  369620991   20480284   9.8G 83 Linux
/dev/sda7        512971578  598692280   85720703  40.9G 82 Linux swap /
Solaris
/dev/sda8        676818513  840665384  163846872  78.1G 83 Linux
/dev/sda9        840665448 1004496254  163830807  78.1G 83 Linux
/dev/sda10      1004496318 1168343189  163846872  78.1G 83 Linux
/dev/sda11      1168343253 1250258624   81915372  39.1G  7
HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda12       598693888  676816895   78123008  37.3G 83 Linux
/dev/sda13       231952384  349138943  117186560  55.9G 83 Linux
/dev/sda14       369623040  512970751  143347712  68.4G 83 Linux

Partition table entries are not in disk order.




Disk /dev/sdb: 465.1 GiB, 499405291520 bytes, 975400960 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x000f8373

Device     Boot Start       End   Sectors   Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1        2048 975400959 975398912 465.1G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
"



--
Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia
..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
  you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
   Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
   "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
   A Trilogy In Four Parts",
   written by Douglas Adams,
   published by Pan Books, 1992
....................................................

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Liam Proven
On 8 March 2018 at 10:08, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:

> The partition with the label Data05-10GB is the ex-Debian6 OS partition, to
> which I wanted to shift some data, to free up more space in the home
> partition.

Wow, that is quite a mess!

Why so many different "Data"-something partitions?

Anyway. I've tried to annotate the list -- here:

Device       Size       Type
/dev/sda1    70.6M      Dell Utility
/dev/sda2    8.6G       HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda3    78.3G      HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda4    509.2G     Extended
/dev/sda5    23.7G      Linux <- root
/dev/sda6    9.8G       Linux <- Data05-10GB
/dev/sda7    40.9G      Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sda8    78.1G      Linux <- not intentionally mounted?
/dev/sda9    78.1G      Linux <- Data01
/dev/sda10   78.1G      Linux <- Data02
/dev/sda11   39.1G      HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/sda12   37.3G      Linux <- Data03
/dev/sda13   55.9G      Linux <- home
/dev/sda14   68.4G      Linux <- Data04

Do you have other OSes on the machine than Windows and Ubuntu? Is that
why there are Data partitions 1/2/3/4 & 5?

If there was Debian and it's gone, then I stand by my suggestion.

Boot off a live medium, remove the old Debian root partition
(/dev/sda6), and one by one, move all the others up, so that the empty
space is used. Then you can enlarge /dev/sda13 by 10GB.

If you do not need Data 1 & 2 to be separate, I would merge sda10 into
sda9 into one volume.

If you do not need Data 3 & 4 to be separate, I would merge them into /home.

For what it's worth, most of my personal machines dual-boot Windows
for occasional client work, updating BIOSes, things like that. I keep
a separate Windows data partition -- as you seem to have in the form
of sda11. I symlink all the subfolders of my home directory
(Documents, Downloads, Pictures etc.) to the similarly-named ones in
my Windows data drive. So all my data is visible from both Windows and
Linux, but my Linux config files stay out of Windows' sight in my
Linux /home filesystem.

You could do the same quite easily.



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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Colin Watson
On Thu, Mar 08, 2018 at 12:46:58PM +0100, Liam Proven wrote:
> Why so many different "Data"-something partitions?

I must say that to me this looks like a system in dire need of being
converted to LVM, if the many filesystems can't be consolidated.  It's
then very much easier to extend, rearrange, and so on.  (Shrinking a
single filesystem is still often a slow process, but that's up to the
filesystem.)

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Liam Proven
On 8 March 2018 at 14:00, Colin Watson <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> I must say that to me this looks like a system in dire need of being
> converted to LVM, if the many filesystems can't be consolidated.  It's
> then very much easier to extend, rearrange, and so on.  (Shrinking a
> single filesystem is still often a slow process, but that's up to the
> filesystem.)

Well, yes, in a way, but 2 questions...

[1] AFAIK it is not possible to dual-boot with Windows if the disk is
partitioned with LVM.

[2] Is it possible to do an in-place conversion? I've read conflicting
reports, of home-grown tools and so on, but it sounds tricky and
possibly dangerous...

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Colin Watson
On Thu, Mar 08, 2018 at 02:26:42PM +0100, Liam Proven wrote:

> On 8 March 2018 at 14:00, Colin Watson <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > I must say that to me this looks like a system in dire need of being
> > converted to LVM, if the many filesystems can't be consolidated.  It's
> > then very much easier to extend, rearrange, and so on.  (Shrinking a
> > single filesystem is still often a slow process, but that's up to the
> > filesystem.)
>
> Well, yes, in a way, but 2 questions...
>
> [1] AFAIK it is not possible to dual-boot with Windows if the disk is
> partitioned with LVM.

I think this is incorrect.  LVM physical volumes are typically
partitions, not the whole disk, for flexibility and compatibility
reasons.  Windows would have to be on an ordinary partition rather than
in a logical volume, of course, and it wouldn't be able to see inside
the LVM volume group, but you could perfectly well have a partition or
two for Windows (and any shared data partitions that are needed) and
then have the rest of the disk be partitions containing LVM PVs.

As far as I know, Windows won't care about the content of the partitions
that contain PVs any more than it cares about the content of any other
partitions it doesn't understand.  It would have to actively put effort
into making this not work.

> [2] Is it possible to do an in-place conversion? I've read conflicting
> reports, of home-grown tools and so on, but it sounds tricky and
> possibly dangerous...

Well, it depends what you mean by "in-place".  If you have enough
unpartitioned space on your disk, then it's straightforward though
tedious, and doesn't require any special tools.  The procedure goes like
this:

 0) ensure that you have sufficient backups
 1) make a PV in the unpartitioned space
 2) add the new PV to a volume group (on the first iteration, this will
    be a new VG)
 3) make a logical volume for the biggest filesystem that will fit in
    the unallocated space in the VG
 4) make a filesystem in the new LV
 5) rsync data from the source filesystem to the target filesystem
 6) update fstab (making sure to use /dev/mapper/ paths rather than
    labels/UUIDs, to avoid future problems with LVM snapshots),
    unmount/remount, update boot loader and initramfs configuration (in
    the case of a root filesystem), and/or reboot if necessary to make
    sure everything still works
 7) delete the partition containing the filesystem you just moved
 8) if any more filesystems will fit in the unallocated space in the VG,
    go to 3
 9) if any filesystems still exist outside LVM that you want to move, go
    to 1

You obviously have to be careful and have a certain amount of general
sysadmin competence, but it doesn't take any scary machinery.  Bonus:
you can stop at the end of any iteration of this loop if you run out of
time or whatever.

I would certainly avoid tools that do *entirely* in-place conversions
without this sort of progressive reallocation approach.  It may well be
technically possible by rewriting bits of metadata around the existing
filesystems, but I agree with you that it sounds tricky and dangerous.

If there isn't enough unpartitioned space to take this approach, or if
the person executing the procedure isn't comfortable with any of the
steps in it, then it's probably going to be better to do step 0,
destructively repartition the system, and restore from backups.  Or just
make a mental note to use LVM for the next new system one installs ...

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Colin Watson                                       [[hidden email]]

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Bret Busby-2
In reply to this post by Bret Busby
On 08/03/2018, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, 7 Mar 2018, Liam Proven wrote:
>
>> Date: Wed, 7 Mar 2018 21:42:54
>> From: Liam Proven <[hidden email]>
>> Reply-To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions"
>>     <[hidden email]>
>> To: "Ubuntu user technical support, not for general discussions"
>>     <[hidden email]>
>> Subject: Re: Query about parasitic firefox file
>>
>> On 7 March 2018 at 13:00, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> I had removed an earlier OS - Debian 6, including reformatting the
>>> partition, but, now, can not write to it, so, apart from a HDD
>>> restructure, I do not have much free space left - about (now) 1.7GB.
>>
>> That's not enough for a safe, usable system these days.
>>
>> Boot off a live medium, run GParted, remove the old Debian partition,
>> and extend your /home partition (or / if you don't have a separate
>> /home) into the free space.
>>
>> For more detailed guidance, post the output of
>>
>> sudo sfdisk -l
>>
>> here.
>>
>
> Whilst it was not requested, here is this;
>
> "
> :~$ df -h
> Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
> udev            7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /dev
> tmpfs           1.6G  9.5M  1.6G   1% /run
> /dev/sda5        24G   11G   12G  48% /
> tmpfs           7.8G   97M  7.7G   2% /dev/shm
> tmpfs           5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
> tmpfs           7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
> /dev/sda13       55G   51G  1.2G  98% /home
> cgmfs           100K     0  100K   0% /run/cgmanager/fs
> tmpfs           1.6G   56K  1.6G   1% /run/user/1000
> /dev/sr1        884K  884K     0 100% /media/bret/HP Launcher
> /dev/sdb1       466G   14G  452G   3% /media/bret/hp hard drive1
> /dev/sda9        77G   73G  884K 100% /media/bret/Data01
> /dev/sda10       77G   73G  4.5M 100% /media/bret/Data02
> /dev/sda12       37G   35G  7.2M 100% /media/bret/Data03
> /dev/sda14       68G   64G  6.1M 100% /media/bret/Data04
> /dev/sda6       9.5G   23M  9.0G   1% /media/bret/Data05-10GB
> /dev/sda8        77G   73G  348K 100%
> /media/bret/a3074725-349d-4647-8b07-3a5526f7ee55
> /dev/sda11       40G   40G  8.6M 100% /media/bret/41B78C85772DD3E4
> "
>
> Note, that is after the particular file was deleted, which freed up
> about 1.7GB of the home partition, and, after subsequent downloads.
>


And, in the time that has passed since I posted that message, firefox
has struck again and again expanded the parasite file, to take up all
of the available free space.

Free space - 0 bytes

places.sqlite-wal  - 1.4GB

It seems to be like a hydatids cyst.

Whilst, on Monday night, at about 1815 UTC+0800, we had a weekly brief
(less than a minute) electricity grid supply failure, that destroyed a
USB drive connected to a device other than one of the computers (the
computers run on a UPS), we have not yet had an electricity grid
supply failure tonight.

So, I am assuming that this problem is due to firefox v58 being
infested with parasites (can firefoxes catch and transmit hydatids?).

Is it possible to upgrade from firefox v58 to firefox v56?

Is firefox v56 still available in the Ubuntu packages repository for
Ubuntu 16.04?

Does Ubuntu have a facility where we can select replacing a current
package version, with an earlier, more stable, version of the package,
such as firefox v56?

--
Bret Busby
Armadale
West Australia
..............

"So once you do know what the question actually is,
 you'll know what the answer means."
- Deep Thought,
 Chapter 28 of Book 1 of
 "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy:
 A Trilogy In Four Parts",
 written by Douglas Adams,
 published by Pan Books, 1992

....................................................

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Colin Watson
On 8 March 2018 at 16:11, Colin Watson <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I think this is incorrect.  LVM physical volumes are typically
> partitions, not the whole disk, for flexibility and compatibility
> reasons.  Windows would have to be on an ordinary partition rather than
> in a logical volume, of course, and it wouldn't be able to see inside
> the LVM volume group, but you could perfectly well have a partition or
> two for Windows (and any shared data partitions that are needed) and
> then have the rest of the disk be partitions containing LVM PVs.
>
> As far as I know, Windows won't care about the content of the partitions
> that contain PVs any more than it cares about the content of any other
> partitions it doesn't understand.  It would have to actively put effort
> into making this not work.

Er. You noted that Bret's disk layout goes:

Dell
Windows
Windows
Extended:
  Linux
  Linux
  Linux
  Linux
  Linux
  Windows
  Linux
  Linux
  Linux

In other words, they are intermixed. I do not think Windows would take
well to that, do you?

An additional parethentical consideration:

Windows can, with the addition of suitable freeware drivers and tools,
read Linux partitions. This is useful. It will not work if you use
LVM.

Secondly, Bret has made comments that indicate some confusion and
problems with the current system -- e.g. his inability to remove an
old Debian partition, because he is running GParted _from within his
running system_.

LVM definitely offers more power and flexibilty, yes, but it is
undeniably more complex and requires more knowledge to successfully
use.

Frankly, without false modesty, I consider myself something of an
expert in the field of PC partitioning and filesystems, and it
confuses me!

I would most definitely _never_ recommend it to any person who:
* was dual-booting multiple non-Linux OSes
* already had a complex setup to deal with
* not a skilled practitioner in Linux server storage

So, not wishing to argue for the sake of it, but no, I think this is
very much *not* a good use case for LVM and I must strongly disagree
with your recommendation of it as a solution.

Similarly to disagreeing with Ralf last year when he advocated a
filesystem layout to someone that included provision for multi-booting
several OSes, when that person had just 1 working Linux and wanted
more space.

I worked in tech support for many years. When someone is in a bad
situation, the best answer is the simplest possible one that will
help. Any unnecessary complexity is an invitation to disaster.
Introducing any unnecessary complications, steps or tools is just
giving more chances for failure.

Remember the KISS principle. Always keep it as simple as possible.


> Well, it depends what you mean by "in-place".  If you have enough
> unpartitioned space on your disk, then it's straightforward though
> tedious, and doesn't require any special tools.  The procedure goes like
> this:
>
>  0) ensure that you have sufficient backups
>  1) make a PV in the unpartitioned space
>  2) add the new PV to a volume group (on the first iteration, this will
>     be a new VG)
>  3) make a logical volume for the biggest filesystem that will fit in
>     the unallocated space in the VG
>  4) make a filesystem in the new LV
>  5) rsync data from the source filesystem to the target filesystem
>  6) update fstab (making sure to use /dev/mapper/ paths rather than
>     labels/UUIDs, to avoid future problems with LVM snapshots),
>     unmount/remount, update boot loader and initramfs configuration (in
>     the case of a root filesystem), and/or reboot if necessary to make
>     sure everything still works
>  7) delete the partition containing the filesystem you just moved
>  8) if any more filesystems will fit in the unallocated space in the VG,
>     go to 3
>  9) if any filesystems still exist outside LVM that you want to move, go
>     to 1

By in-place, I mean is it possible to run  a command or tool that will
turn existing MBR partitions into LVM volumes, after which space can
be combined or re-allocated.

I do not mean a process of gradual incremental creation of new
volumes, moving  data into them, and then removing old ones. That is
not "in place".

If Bret is having difficulty removing one existing ext4 volume
(because it is mounted), is the complex 9-step process you suggest
really a good alternative?

I think the answer is a very clear "no".

> You obviously have to be careful and have a certain amount of general
> sysadmin competence,

But we have evidence that he does not have that.

> If there isn't enough unpartitioned space to take this approach,

There isn't. We can see that.

> or if
> the person executing the procedure isn't comfortable with any of the
> steps in it

We can already see that he is not.

> then it's probably going to be better to do step 0,
> destructively repartition the system, and restore from backups.

We do not know that he has any.

Why destructively repartition? There is nothing here that can't be
done with Gparted from a standard unmodified Ubuntu install medium.

> Or just
> make a mental note to use LVM for the next new system one installs ...

Not for those without a high level of technical skill, no.

An important element of giving advice is to pitch it at an appropriate
level for the person being advised.

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Colin Law-2
In reply to this post by Bret Busby-2
On 8 March 2018 at 16:50, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:
> ...
> And, in the time that has passed since I posted that message, firefox
> has struck again and again expanded the parasite file, to take up all
> of the available free space.

Start by disabling all the extensions and see if it still does it.
The other thing to try if that doesn't work is to reset the profile.
Google will tell you how.

If you do want to go back to an older version you can install Waterfox
instead, which continues to support the old add-ons that Firefox no
longer supports.

Colin

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Re: Query about parasitic firefox file

Liam Proven
In reply to this post by Bret Busby-2
On 8 March 2018 at 17:50, Bret Busby <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> So, I am assuming that this problem is due to firefox v58 being
> infested with parasites (can firefoxes catch and transmit hydatids?).

I doubt it.

> Is it possible to upgrade from firefox v58 to firefox v56?

I do get your point -- I don't like Firefox 57+ myself -- but bear in
mind that this list has many non-native English speakers and this
ironic use of "upgrade" is confusing.

> Is firefox v56 still available in the Ubuntu packages repository for
> Ubuntu 16.04?

As far as I know, no. However, you can use the last ESR release. This
is what I am doing on some of my machines.

Firefox 52 is the current ESR release:

https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/organizations/

Here is how to install it:

https://askubuntu.com/questions/894871/how-do-i-install-firefox-52-esr-on-16-04

> Does Ubuntu have a facility where we can select replacing a current
> package version, with an earlier, more stable, version of the package,
> such as firefox v56?

Not if it has been superseded by a new release and removed, no. You
can pin obsolete packages but for something as critical as a web
browser this is *not* a good idea.

I am experimenting with Waterfox on one of my Ubuntu machines, as
Colin suggests.

However, I am experiencing some small issues -- for instance, I had to
remove the "Vertical Tabs (Simplified)" extension and replace it with
"Tree Style Tabs", which I do not like as much.

It is working fine for me on Windows and Mac OS X, though. Waterfox is
currently based on Firefox 56 and it is receiving regular updates and
security fixes.

However, so is the ESR release.

Here are some instructions on installing Waterfox:

https://askubuntu.com/questions/935466/how-do-i-install-waterfox

I strongly recommend NOT following the instructions about using tar,
as it will not get any updates.

Use the PPA.

But I warn you, using the ESR version is less hassle.

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